open found and Susan

Knowledge = negotiation

CCK08

davecormier rhizomatic-education-community-as-curriculum/

Some excerpts from the article about rhizomatic learning:

Knowledge as negotiation is not an entirely new concept in educational circles; social contructivist and connectivist pedagogies, for instance, are centered on the process of negotiation as a learning process. Neither of these theories, however, is sufficient to represent the nature of learning in the online world. There is an assumption in both theories that the learning process should happen organically but that knowledge, or what is to be learned, is still something independently verifiable with a definitive beginning and end goal determined by curriculum.

A botanical metaphor, first posited by Deleuze and Guattari in A Thousand Plateaus (1987), may offer a more flexible conception of knowledge for the information age: the rhizome. A rhizomatic plant has no center and no defined boundary; rather, it is made up of a number of semi-independent nodes, each of which is capable of growing and spreading on its own, bounded only by the limits of its habitat (Cormier 2008). In the rhizomatic view, knowledge can only be negotiated, and the contextual, collaborative learning experience shared by constructivist and connectivist pedagogies is a social as well as a personal knowledge-creation process with mutable goals and constantly negotiated premises. The rhizome metaphor, which represents a critical leap in coping with the loss of a canon against which to compare, judge, and value knowledge, may be particularly apt as a model for disciplines on the bleeding edge where the canon is fluid and knowledge is a moving target.

bleeding edge???? as in over-ripe?

Changing Knowledge

New communication technologies and the speeds at which they allow the dissemination of information and the conversion of information to knowledge have forced us to reexamine what constitutes knowledge; moreover, it has encouraged us to take a critical look at where it can be found and how it can be validated…..Online access to thousands of primary documents may be provided via the Internet for less than it costs to provide far fewer examples in a traditional textbook package (Rosenzweig 2003). In addition to this increased accessibility of primary documents, a new breed of user-generated content has emerged on collaborative Web sites and in other online venues. Web sites such as EdTechTalk, The Webcast Academy, and the Open Habitat Project collate the work of a variety of professionals to create snapshots of the knowledge of a particular field as it is seen at a given time (Cormier 2008).

I agree, it makes sence…

Thus the foundations upon which we are working are changing as well as the speed at which new information must be integrated into those foundations….Information is coming too fast for our traditional methods of expert verification to adapt.

Wikis and similar tools offer a participatory medium that can allow for communal negotiation of knowledge….(Exhibit 3). Students in Couros’s class worked from a curriculum created through their own negotiations of knowledge and formed their own personally mapped networks, thereby contributing to the rhizomatic structure in their field of study.

misunderstanding… the new knowledge landscape that challenges traditional notions of canon

the community is not the path to understanding or accessing the curriculum; rather, the community is the curriculum.

If a given bit of information is recognized as useful to the community or proves itself able to do something, it can be counted as knowledge.

the community is not the path to understanding or accessing the curriculum; rather, the community is the curriculum.

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This entry was published on SeptemberUTCbThu, 18 Sep 2008 16:29:23 +0000000000pmThu, 18 Sep 2008 16:29:23 +000008 24, 2007 at 0.13. It’s filed under rhizomatic and tagged , , . Bookmark the permalink. Follow any comments here with the RSS feed for this post.

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